Content © 2012-2017 by American IronHorse Owners Organization.  Use of AIH Logo Licensed by American Ironhorse, LLC
Resourcing, Recycling, and Wastefulness   Some months ago I took a trip out on my Tejas with a friend on his Panhead, to the local S & S dealer around 15 miles away. Three miles into the journey my Ironhorse began popping and misfiring with the occasional very loud backfiring. This was more notable when opening the throttle and climbing the slightest incline. Down quiet country lanes at just 30 mph it seemed to get worse. We stopped and I checked battery terminals, electrical leads and other connections. I knew I had enough petrol and my instinct told me it was not a carburettor issue and this was confirmed by my buddy who said that on the occasional back fire, my rear lights flickered. This suggested the problem was electrical and my thoughts were of the coil. We arrived at our destination and after some small talk, and thinking of past experiences, decided to eliminate the problem by replacing - when faced with multiple possibilities - the cheapest thing first: spark plugs. $15 and five minutes later, the new plugs were fitted and we set off back. Fifty yards down the road the problem started again. I arrived home soon after, safely though slightly embarrassed. I removed the coil cover and noticed the front lead very slack at the connection to the coil. Tightening the lead, the problem was solved ... as simple as that! Two completely different issues came to mind a short time later... Some years ago I was in Bombay, India during the monsoon season and I toured the sights of the city on a push-bike at 7.00 am, when the traffic was low. I was forced to take shelter when a sudden downpour of rain forced me to. During the downpour, from the rear of a famous landmark hotel where a basic room can cost over $1000 per night, two large skips full of waste food were wheeled onto the road to await collection. A young man appeared from nowhere in ragged clothes with the rain pelting down and trawled the skips, picking out food scraps and devouring them on the spot ... probably the most pathetic sight I have ever seen! Nothing in this part of the world is wasted; people walk the streets gathering empty plastic bottles for recycling and cars and even large ships are stripped down and everything is re-sold – I’ve seen it! Everything seems to have a value. Fast forward, and two weeks ago I was in my local supermarket waiting at the meat counter to be served. The lady behind the counter had just cut two slices of hot beef to make a sandwich for a customer. This amazing joint of hot beef was as large as a full size crash helmet and as she walked back to the customer with the prepared sandwich, the beef rolled off the block and onto the floor. "Is it half price now?" I asked. "It isn't anything", she replied, "It's going in the bin!". After some mild banter and many pleas I was forced to ask for the manager where I repeated my concerns but to no avail: "If a quarter inch is removed all around the beef then surely it is still edible"  and "My dog would give his right leg just to smell it". I watched as the beef was summoned to the bin. I asked if the 'Pig man' would collect it later and was told: "No Pig-man now. The EU directive instructs that all food waste has to be incinerated". Needless to say I left the store with my tail between my legs! The floor of that supermarket was spotless; me thinks 'A lot cleaner than my kitchen floor! Talk about wastefulness? My immediate thoughts were that of the millions of people around the world who are starving and have never even tasted beef. Back to my bike. The fact that I purchased two new spark plugs to "Eliminate the back-firing problem" seemed correct at the time, but was not needed. I tightened my HT leads and reinstalled the original spark plugs in my Tejas; the 'new plugs' await their time when needed. I refuse to 'replace new plugs for old' when it is unnecessary ... just for the sake of it ... now that would be wasteful, wouldn't it?
Guest Author -  “Marl”;  United Kingdom November, 2012
ORGANIZATION ORGANIZATION OWNERS OWNERS For All American Ironhorse Motorcycle Owners
Guest Authors
© 2012-2017   American IronHorse Owners Organization Use of AIH Logo Licensed by American Ironhorse, LLC 
Resourcing, Recycling, and Wastefulness   Some months ago I took a trip out on my Tejas with a friend on his Panhead, to the local S & S dealer around 15 miles away. Three miles into the journey my Ironhorse began popping and misfiring with the occasional very loud backfiring. This was more notable when opening the throttle and climbing the slightest incline. Down quiet country lanes at just 30 mph it seemed to get worse. We stopped and I checked battery terminals, electrical leads and other connections. I knew I had enough petrol and my instinct told me it was not a carburettor issue and this was confirmed by my buddy who said that on the occasional back fire, my rear lights flickered. This suggested the problem was electrical and my thoughts were of the coil. We arrived at our destination and after some small talk, and thinking of past experiences, decided to eliminate the problem by replacing - when faced with multiple possibilities - the cheapest thing first: spark plugs. $15 and five minutes later, the new plugs were fitted and we set off back. Fifty yards down the road the problem started again. I arrived home soon after, safely though slightly embarrassed. I removed the coil cover and noticed the front lead very slack at the connection to the coil. Tightening the lead, the problem was solved ... as simple as that! Two completely different issues came to mind a short time  later... Some years ago I was in Bombay, India during the monsoon season and I toured the sights of the city on a push-bike at 7.00 am, when the traffic was low. I was forced to take shelter when a sudden downpour of rain forced me to. During the downpour, from the rear of a famous landmark hotel where a basic room can cost over $1000 per night, two large skips full of waste food were wheeled onto the road to await collection. A young man appeared from nowhere in ragged clothes with the rain pelting down and trawled the skips, picking out food scraps and devouring them on the spot ... probably the most pathetic sight I  have ever seen! Nothing in this part of the world is wasted; people walk the streets gathering empty plastic bottles for recycling and cars and even large ships are stripped down and everything is re-sold – I’ve seen it! Everything seems to have a value. Fast forward, and two weeks ago I was in my local supermarket waiting at the meat counter to be served. The lady behind the counter had just cut two slices of hot beef to make a sandwich for a customer. This amazing joint of hot beef was as large as a full size crash helmet and as she walked back to the customer  with the prepared sandwich, the beef rolled off the block and  onto the floor. "Is it half price now?" I asked. "It isn't anything", she replied, "It's going in the bin!". After some mild banter and many pleas I was forced to ask for the manager where I repeated my concerns but to no avail: "If a quarter inch is removed all around the beef then surely it is still edible" and "My dog would give his right leg just to smell it". I watched as the beef was summoned to the bin. I asked if the 'Pig man' would collect it later and was told: "No Pig-man now.  The EU directive instructs that all food waste has to be  incinerated". Needless to say I left the store with my tail between my legs! The floor of that supermarket was spotless; me thinks 'A lot cleaner than my kitchen floor! Talk about wastefulness? My immediate thoughts were that of the millions of people around the world who are starving and have never even tasted beef. Back to my bike. The fact that I purchased two new spark plugs to "Eliminate the back-firing problem" seemed correct at the time, but was not needed. I tightened my HT leads and reinstalled the original spark plugs in my Tejas; the 'new plugs' await their time when needed. I refuse to 'replace new plugs for old' when it is unnecessary ... just for the sake of it ... now that would be wasteful, wouldn't it?
Guest Author -  “Marl”;  United Kingdom November, 2012
ORGANIZATION ORGANIZATION OWNERS OWNERS
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